TripAdvisor Halts Ticket Sales to Cruel Wildlife Attractions

PHOTOGRAPH BY SCOTT S. WARREN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

PHOTOGRAPH BY SCOTT S. WARREN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

Wildlife attractions have always been considered some of the most rentable ways of tourism. Still, that does not mean that in all the places of the world that sort of trips follow the regulations.

It was well known for everybody: that in some place which people can swim with dolphins those are confined, that elephants are beaten and that tigers tend to be sedated for to do not be so aggressive with the traveler whom wanted to take a picture with any of them. Until here and much more was recorded. The problem is people cannot recognise, in some cases, in which sort of attractions are animal abuse and in which it does not.

One and a half year ago, the London based World Animal Protection reported to National Geographic Welfare about this sort of tourist incidents which drew attention to TripAdvisor whom seemed to promote them online. It seemed shocking than one of the most followed web platforms was encouraging that, until everything was revealed and proved that those animals were living in unfair conditions.

For this reason, TripAdvisor has changed their own privacy policies. They are going to stop to sell those sort of trips or tickets to certain animal attractions and it is going to launch -next year- a new website portal in collaboration with World Animal Protection, Oxford University’s WildCRU, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and other welfare and conservationists NGO. The mission is not only to ban those sort of illegal measures if not to educate all the people whom does not know about that, to identify those places and to help people to choose wisely their best vacation spot. Because holidays can be without the need of to harm other living beings. But, above all, because working all together more things can be fixed for to make a better world and, at the end, that is what it matters.

You can read the full National Geographic’s piece here.

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